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FeaturedInterviews

Interview: Jason M Norwood

‘This month: Jason M Norwood, native to London, ON, Canada and long-time veteran here – was kind enough to give us his words about #WEATNU, his former artist name, Minutes After, and his latest release under the Berlin School music he creates.’

Interview by: Almark

Hello Jason, please tell in your own words what #WEATNU has done for you. Tell us a story of your own?

JN: I like to search for new music a lot, and I can’t remember for the life of me how I discovered her, but I discovered an artist named Adryelle, and reached out via Twitter to mention I was a fan.  Almark and I got talking through Twitter threads, and I discovered that he ran this enterprise called WEATNU.  Running a tiny little label myself, we got talking on that score, and at the same time I was looking for a home for Minutes After, a techno-based solo project of mine that didn’t fit with my label’s aesthetic.  The rest is fairly normal—I sent Almark some music, he liked it and asked about releasing it, and I signed on.  I liked the concept of WEATNU being an artist-helping-artists collective, which is something I’ve always strongly believed in.

It’s funny, because I’ve since devolved my label into an artist collective.  Minutes After is shelved, but for the first time I get to release my 25-year-long solo project (stuff under my own name) with WEATNU—no talk of “I want another Minutes After” album, just support for the broader sense of what I do.

I get to talk to a like-minded label head, I get to support an idea that I agree with, and I get to be a part of a community where I can offer my skills and bounce ideas off of others.  What’s not to like?

How did you first find out about #WEATNU and what were your thoughts initially?

JN: I think I got drawn into #WEATNU because I saw a kindred spirit in this unwieldy thing called the music business.  I’d been running my own thing, Hope Mansion Recordings, for a while, and it was nice to see something in operation that was designed to help artists.  At the same time, I had a rare side project called Minutes After, which was heavily techno-based and didn’t sit right on my own label, so I decided to give it a home I liked and respected, where it would be a little cozier.

I can’t say there was anything specific I wanted out of #WEATNU going into that.  Out of head-to-head conversations between two people trying to do something different in music, the whole conversation seemed to develop naturally.  I also liked the idea of supporting something whose ideals I agreed with.

Fast forward to now, and although Minutes After has ended, we’re talking about releasing the Berlin-school electronic music I release under my own name.  It’ll be the first time in 25 years I’ve put that project out under a different label, which gives you an idea of how I get along with #WEATNU.

What do you feel #WEATNU is doing for the modern indie artist, how is it serving them, because now we have our magazine once again?

JN:  I think the word “flexibility” is the first thing that comes to mind.  In a world where artists can be independent and make good quality albums in the comfort of their own personal studios, sacrificing things like artistic control isn’t really necessary.  Also, technology has led to a lot of possibilities as to how a label can operate.  So, #WEATNU doesn’t look to sign people to take control, I think it’s about asking the artists “What do you need?”  It’s all there, but you have the freedom to operate on a loose alliance or a full signing, and everything in between.

I’ve always felt the most interesting independent labels are the ones where you like one artist, you get curious and start crate-digging through the label roster, and #WEATNU has that in spades, but also it uses what’s there to give artists a platform to talk about what they do—hence, the magazine.  Not only putting out music, but providing the story behind it in a way that fans want more of now than they ever did.

Where do you see #weatnurecords going, now that we are nearing our 5th year?

JN: I think the label will continue to do good things!  I think the fact that its different approach is what gives it prominence—this idea that artists and labels can make the goals a common drive rather than have an employer/employee relationship is healthier, and it will allow the artists on #WEATNU the chance to show what they can do without having to change themselves or their art.

Almark – #WEATNU Digital Magazine – Nov 2019
Proofing: Jason M Norwood

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reviews

World (Step Inside My Dream) – Single by Fat Mavis

The first time I saw the film “Trainspotting”, I clearly remember its music, with the track Born Slippy, by Underworld, while hearing the deepest emotions of the group, I fell in love with the song. But this single, just released by Fat Mavis takes me back to that era during the 90’s. Fat Mavis sends us tracks now and then, so it was a real treat to hear this one. We have a mix between Pet Shop Boys, elements of classic dance, UK pop and electro. With a collaborative effort of Fat Mavis and friends, vocals from local musicians in the London area. The track takes you to the edge of Techno, lights flashing in the club, under the dark guise of the nightlife, and finishes off with a nice shot of sequined sequences. Spoken and repeated vocals continue with this catchy tune.  We hope to hear more from him in the near future. 

Purchase on Bandcamp
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Listen on Spotify

<iframe src=”https://open.spotify.com/embed/album/1UYc1ER6RFalKYIBtC9yx1″ width=”300″ height=”200″></iframe>
Almark#WEATNU Digital Magazine – November 2019

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ArchivesNew albums

WEATNU Records: Year one

For an entire year WEATNU has been building a large group of artists on it’s label WEATNU Records. You’ve heard many of them throughout the months. Now you can hear them all together on the same album. Showcasing 74 amazing electronic artists, including punk and post-punk, dream-pop, nu jazz swing. You can buy this great piece of underground history for 9.80 USD. Complete with a wide variety of styles from all over the world. WEATNU Records continues to take in the greatest of hidden talent. All artists receive 70% per sale. WEATNU believes in fair pay to the artist.

Purchase on Bandcamp

<iframe style=”border: 0; width: 350px; height: 470px;” src=”https://bandcamp.com/EmbeddedPlayer/album=3474610779/size=large/bgcol=ffffff/linkcol=0687f5/tracklist=false/transparent=true/” width=”300″ height=”150″ seamless=””>WEATNU Records: Year One by WEATNU RECORDS</iframe>


#WEATNU Digital Magazine

Dec 2015

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EchoStation – Your dance invasion

To bring in The New Year with a bang #WEATNU has been preparing it’s latest 24/7 Internet stream, EchoStation. The next radio of our 5 portals will play dance-related Electronica. Covering a wide variety of club themes, such as dance, electro, techno, deephouse, dub, DnB, IDM, House, Electro House and more. Mixtapes are accepted including long sets. Already there has been an influx in more underground enthusiasts coming to #WEATNU due to this move. The music will be fantastic, taking in more of the unknown world of electronic music. Building up a new set of artists for 2016, some of which we hope will come to WEATNU Records. EchoStation will launch on New Years Eve and provide DJ’s and producers a means to be heard through the WEATNU movement. Below are the first to join with us, and just a taste of what’s to come! Some regulars such as WSM and ChibarRecords to name a few, and newcomers to WEATNU M-O-I, Paul2Paul and Luke Corbin.

#WEATNU Digital Magazine 

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ArchivesNew Videos

Waffensupermarkt – DIE REISE

German producer/DJ and Label owner, Guido Braun brings us his latest video – DIE REISE. Filled with chilled underground/deep house. A smooth sound of both German/London vibes that any classic techno lover would enjoy. If you enjoy Underworld, then you’ll certainly appreciate Waffensupermarkt. We love videos here on #WEATNU DM. Check out his other works through WSM and WEATNU RECORDS.

Follow Guido Braun on Twitter

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ArchivesInterviews

Interview with Jazzykat

“Jazzykat’s world of music is infused with multi-genres, electronica, experimental, soul, chillout and synthpop. Her wide range of ‘eclectic moods’ come together to form the sound that we have been hearing for many months on WEATNU [OUR]. Along with her career as a solo musician, it was finally time to bring her words in text-form to the light here on #WEATNU DM.”

Corbin: First and foremost I would like to thank you for taking the time to let me interview you Kathryn.

Jazzy: It’s my pleasure.

Corbin: I understand you have a new album coming out. What is the name going to be?

Jazzy: World Upside Down

Corbin: I’ve grown accustomed to you innovative style. Is this album jumping these boundaries?

Jazzy: I made an album a while back named Eclectic Moods, and that pretty much sums up what to expect from me each time I release something new. Each song will always be different, I keep the music interesting that way.

Corbin: Since listening to your interview with Almark, I have been wondering when we may hear some Jazzy vocals?

Jazzy: If you mean will I ever sing on a song? No, I don’t foresee that happening.
I put so much thought and feeling in each song, I just don’t feel the need to sing. I can sing but even if I’m listening to Electronic music in private, I prefer instrumentals.

Corbin: Not even a little vocoder?

Jazzy: I’ve never used one. I’m afraid you’ll have to settle for the versatility of my songs. I will say that this new album has four new songs and six singles. I have wandered into some new territories in each song, such as, Nu Disco, New Wave, Electronica and Techno.
I do remember a song called Sunset Bay I made years ago, and I introduced the song in a sultry ladies DJ voice, resembling The Fog movie.

Corbin: If you could come across a link for that, what a treat to hear your voice!

Jazzy: I’ll get with Almark, see what we can do. Didn’t you hear me speaking in the interview with him?

Corbin: Of course! That’s what spawned the question.

Jazzy: Oh, you liked that hummm
I do have an Oklahoma accent.

Corbin: Accents help to build character across the microphone. Being from the South myself I often wonder if it comes across in my own vocals. Your voice is also quite unique.

Jazzy: In my younger days I played piano bars all over Tulsa, played at the Camelot Inn for several years, singing some of the songs that people requested, and I did enjoy singing.

Corbin: So what changed?

Jazzy: I found Electronic Music and fell in love because it came at a time when there was a lull in good music. I was burned out on classic rock and Synthpop had dissolved so when I first heard Moby, Dzihan and Kamien, The Dining Rooms, Thievery Corporation, I knew that I wanted to do what they were doing.
Actually, my son encouraged me because of my musical ability and although I was new to computers, I began to play around with Ableton. Learned it very easily and went on from there.

Corbin: The first time I heard Porcelian by Moby I was in awe! It really changed my outlook on the whole band scene. Since your last voice interview with WEATNU you have been quite busy and even started your own Chillout/Electronic group on Facebook. What started this ball rolling?

Jazzy: Because I know how it feels to have an all consuming fire inside to be really good at Electronic music, practice makes perfect and although I don’t need stardom, a few fans would be nice. I wanted Electronic musicians to feel important and I know how it feels to be totally ignored after you have spent months working on a project that you think is YOU. I can’t be someone else because of my deep seeded desire to make good music and besides, if I never make a dime, it’s a challenge and it’s fun to hear the end product.
Our motto in The Electronic/Chillout Musician’s Circle came from my heart to every musician that I have in my Circle “Everyone needs praise – it keeps us motivated.”
I belong to twelve musical groups and none of them do promotion like I do in the Circle. They need to want to be in the Circle and mostly they just want to be HEARD.

Corbin: Your member numbers are growing astronomically, care to comment on this feat?

Jazzy: I’ve noticed that too, I guess I would have to say “word of mouth,” some of the musicians, especially the ones in Europe must be trying to make the Circle a “household word,” that’s okay.

Corbin: Very much so! Does it encompass a lot of your time to oversee this group?

Jazzy: I have made an organized system so I can keep track of their names, the songs that person uploads, the albums, the videos and the links they have included so I can refer the public to their outside music.

Corbin: I often wonder what artists do for work, as it subconsciously fuels their creative essence. I am an auto technician by day, what is your livelihood?

Jazzy: I am a retired legal secretary and musician.

Corbin: So with the new album almost complete, aside from its promotion what is the next move for Jazzykat?

Jazzy: Let me offer you some information about my musical endeavors. I have made five albums and one EP through Weatnu and in answer to your question I will continue to make Electronic music and learn and use new genres in my albums and singles. On albums such as, Vanilla Crunch, and Think about your Future on Weatnu Records.

Corbin: Very good! Keep them coming. I read your article on Thom Yorke here in #WEATNU Digital Magazine. Are you going to be writing some more articles in the near future? How about any collaborations coming up?

Jazzy: Yes, indeed, I really enjoy doing those articles. I will be doing new articles about Electronic Pioneers and I have been debating about something new in the magazine, I think I will also start a new article regarding 80’s Synthpop Superstars, that should be interesting.
Since the ever popular Glory Be, we’ll call it, I haven’t given it much thought. With the Circle promotions and making new music I probably wouldn’t have time.

Corbin: Yes MDS is a super huge project!! Do you think the Chillout/Electronic group will get together for something like that venture?

Jazzy: We are so new, it’s really hard to say right now.

Corbin: I listen to everything WEATNU had to offer as a moderator for our soundcloud account. When I play your music at work, people instantly turn their heads, and yet there are vocals to speak of. What you bring to the WEATNU movement is quite unique. Do you feel that your music influences others or is it your persona? Or both?

Jazzy: All I do is pour out the beats I love, the percussion, which gives that song an edge of surprise, or whatever you indeed want the song to sound like. The chords you play, the sequences are very important while keeping it lively. The kick is a vital important asset today and the melodies are just as important.  I really want people to enjoy my music and hopefully they feel that desire when they hear them…I hope so!
When I begin a new song, it must be different, in most respects, a catchy bass intro, merging with a good-sounding kick, maybe some fx and go from there, as they say, “it’s your thing….do what you wanna do.”

Corbin: Great reference! Your albums are such an “easy listen” not to be confused with the genre “easy listening”. I put on Bufinger‘s album and had an entire dashboard and heater core out of a vehicle in 2 hours. I’m listening to you now and taking my time with a rather large job I’m doing now. I don’t have to change the channel or turn it down as people come by trying to communicate with me. That is something very unique about your music, its flow and architecture. Care to elaborate?

Jazzy: I would really like to try something heavier, but so far the song Eccentric Minds is probably the heaviest I have done. In fact, I have included it in the new album.
In answer to your last question, I will say that has to do with Almark’s mastering. He’s very particular about the audio sound in the music he is working on.

Corbin: Your songs seem to cover a wide range of musical influences. Are there a couple of genres in particular that you feel have shaped the course of your music career?

Jazzy: In the sixties, R&B, Pop, Funk, Soul and Jazz. The seventies had Marvin Gaye, Huey Lewis, The GAP Band from Tulsa, James Brown, The Doobies and The Commodores. Jazz was still popular with Dave Brubeck and others. Hall & Oates, Led Zeppelin and Disco were popular, and there was a huge variety of genres to choose from. I liked all of these.
I guess my music has been influenced by all these genres and now they are mixed with Electronic, Experimental, Dance, Techno, and now NewWave, NuDisco and Electronica.

Corbin: Besides your DAW of choice, what other instruments do you use regularly in your recordings?

Jazzy: Along with Ableton, I use an Axiom Air MIDI Keyboard with Nexus software which gives me a wide variety of beats, pads and instruments, such as piano, bass and drum pads, mixed in with fx sounds. I am now composing new songs with more keyboard beats, and melodies. I also play the accordian and the ukelele, haha just kidding.

Corbin: I must say Kathryn it has been a real pleasure being able to get a better understanding on what makes your music so unique. Is there anything else you would care to comment on?

Jazzy: Please buy my new album. That’s It! Thanks Corbin for your support.

Follow Jazzykat on Twitter.

#WEATNU Digital Magazine – Interview by Corbin Roof

Intro by Almark

Pre-order Jazzykat’s latest album ‘World Upside Down’ On Weatnu Records.

4 Brand new songs appear on this album.

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ArchivesNew Music

WAFFENSUPERMARKT – FEELING ALRIGHT feat. AANYA

German producer, DJ and Label owner for WAFFENSUPERMARKT, Guido Braun does not disappoint. This month his latest release “FEELING ALRIGHT feat. AANYA” displays classic house, techno tendencies that any modern DJ would enjoy playing for their spin tracks. His music has been spinning on #WEATNU OUR for some time now. Buy his music on http://wsm.onl and also through Weatnu Records

Follow Guido on Twitter.

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ArchivesArticles

Electronic Music Pioneers #1

ELECTRONIC MUSIC PIONEERS

Richard Melville Hall was born on September 11, 1965 in Harlem, New York. Richard was a small
boy, fragile, you could say. As a small child, he was constantly bullied, which of course kept the Hall household in an uproar. Finally, not being able to cope one more day, his parents decided to change his name. Richard loved to read and his favorite novel was written by Herman Melville.

In fact, Richard’s great-great-great uncle, Herman Melville, as we all know, wrote the memorable story about a man who was bound and determined to kill a whale. . .enter, MOBY.
Moby, the American Electronic singer-songwriter and known for Porcelain, among many other songs, including Flower, the lead in song for Gone in Sixty Seconds 2002 is definitely one of the most revered pioneers of Electronic Music.

Moby spent a lot of time by himself and grew to love music at a young age. Listening to his mother play the piano, Moby began guitar and music theory lessons. His first band consisted of several high school friends and they released an EP, “Hit Squad for God.” Later in school, he joined a new band Awol.

Although he enrolled in college, studying philosophy, he decided what he really yearned to do
was a full-time music career. Thus, working his way up the proverbial ladder toward stardom, he
worked at a record store, played with local bands, and DJing for local nightclubs. The DJ gigs helped him achieve the ultimate success he had longed for.

Moby moved to New York City in 1989 and released his first single, “Mobility” in 1990. His second single, “Go” pushed Moby into the mainstream audiences and the song became a Top 10 hit in the United Kingdom. Now, Moby was becoming a popular Electronic and Dance figure.
Moby released his first Techno album in 1995, “Everything is Wrong”, which was hailed as a success.

In 1996 a Punk Rock album, namely “Animal Rights,” was followed by his 1999 album, “Play.” This
album sold more than 9 million copies worldwide.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JMKmfO0SHJg

Moby released “Play” with “18,” two highly successful albums that sold more than 4 million
copies worldwide. Some of his newer releases and albums were “Hotel,” 2005, “Last Night,” 2008
“Wait for Me,” 2009, “Destroyed,” 2011 and “Wait for Me,” 2013.

Moby’s personal attributes consist of having a deep faith in the teachings of Christ and he is very public about it. Moby is also a “vegan,” and an animal rights activist, which, according to Moby, has brought him considerable scorn in the entertainment industry. A lot of people are instantly filled with ridicule at the idea that someone wouldn’t eat meat.

Moby has inserts in his CDs through essays, regarding his views on religion and animal rights.
Moby has been cited as saying, ” I want to make music that not only entertains, but performs a
function. Music can always serve a role in people’s lives when it’s emotion and warm and inviting and beautiful. Also he says, “I hope that when I find myself no longer a public figure, which could be in six months or two weeks or 10 years, or whenever, I can give it up gracefully and not be bitter, but for now, sometimes it’s fun indulging in the pitfalls a little bit.”

Words of wisdom spoken by Moby – a TRUE ELECTRONIC MUSIC PIONEER.”

Jazzykat #WEATNU Digital Magazine

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