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The Story of #WEATNU

“It takes years for an idea to culminate and become something more than mindless thinking. Every diamond is created due to a great amount of pressure. I’m a musician, I write Electronic / Avant-garde, Left-field music. It is certainly in its own category.”

Coming from the roots of Industrial / Experimental and EBM, Ambient, Dub, and eventually those roots became an urge to write my own music, and I didn’t know what I was doing or how to go about doing it electronically.

I had been writing guitar music prior to that from 1992–1998, then getting into writing Electronic music that summer. Music has been with me since 1983, when my Mother first put on, Wham or Hall & Oats, H2O record, or when I heard the album, The Ghostbusters on tape, and being captivated by The Thompson Twins — In the Name of Love. When the Internet had its start in 1997 for me, I found myself seeking out music that moved me differently than terrestrial radio, as during this time, radio was dying out and becoming something of a mainstream money maker. MTV was still going strong in its post-grunge era.

One night, I started looking on Yahoo for internet radio stations, Realplayer had its share of the obscure, even at its low bitrate quality, but I didn’t care, the music is what moved me. It wasn’t long until I found a website called Radio Free Underground, they shut down in 2000, sadly. They played many genres I’d not heard, other than the experimental stuff I discovered through MTV’s The AMP. Goth being one of them, including PsyTrance, Techno, Electro, Electronica, Industrial, Darkwave, and more. The days when true discovery felt like you found something, and it was yours, it felt personal.

I remember first hearing Industrial from a NIN tape a friend gave me during school in 1992, then he gave me a recording of Ministry’s Psalm 69. By the time 1997 rolled around, I was hooked on darker underground music. After being subjected to the more obscure underground, including the MOD scene of 1995, given to me through floppy discs from friends, AMIGA-like computer music, Trackers, Fasttracker, iPlay, S3M, FT2 and so forth.

From the collection of all this, I started developing a great love for “The Underground”, and noticed from my experimenting with Electronic music, deeply in 2000 that Electronic wasn’t that huge yet, though, radio and modern music was still very pop-driven, and rock based. It wasn’t until 2003 and 2005 where I started really hearing the Electronic influence in artists, such as Aphex Twin, Squarepusher, Underworld, The Orb and Orbital.

The Severed Heads years…

I was actually heavily influenced from my early days of electronic music writing from Severed Heads, an Aussie artist, named Tom Ellard. For years after 1998 I didn’t have the Internet, I had to go to local university computer labs to use the Internet, usually every night for months on end. During the time of my depth into making electronic in 2000 through tracker software, Fasttracker II, I found myself looking up Severed Heads, who I was introduced to from a boss at my job Eureka Pizza in Springdale, AR.

I no longer felt like mainstream music was important as it once was, I had a drive to do different things. In that computer lab, I came across a website called groovetech.com, and this was my introduction into DnB, Dub, Experimental, Techno, Sampling, from some of the greatest DJs to ever be broadcast through camera, across the world.

Each night I was engrossed in watching these DJs spin for hours. The music was catchy, bouncy and addictive. Even to this day if you look up those podcasts on YouTube, you hear something special just starting to happen. The beginning of what electronic music was, and why it’s so important today.

Years pass…

My love of electronic music continued, in writing it alone, allowing only my family and at the time, during my marriage, my wife and her friends. Also in 2001 I didn’t have the Internet, but I still continued when I could, go to the local library to use it. By the time I got the Internet again, it was around 2010, and I began to think, “what if I upload this music I’ve been doing all these years, and let others listen?” It was through Soundcloud then Bandcamp, and YouTube, I started doing this. Friends on Facebook would tell me I should let others listen, I was reluctant of course, because it was so personal to me.

From venturing forth into various groups online, uploading music and speaking and promoting on twitter, I came to realize that unknown artists were being ignored, or even unheard. That it took a great deal of effort to even get people to listen. Of course during the early days of SoundCloud, people would listen to you more, due to the lack of algorithms.

The power of Social Media.

From the urge to get my own music heard and having a hard time doing it, it started building up in me by 2012–2013 that something needed to be done, something big, a huge idea, and since social media was just getting popular, I thought, “Why not, I want to make waves and create a storm even if I fail doing so. People on social media are making things happen, so why can’t I?” I thought.

During those days, it was hard to find any kind of help to get your music heard. Net-labels were elite and only allowed a certain type of music in, EDM was so big that people were making 200 grand per night when they played; completely ignoring The Underground scene. I wondered, why The Underground and experimental music was no longer around? What happened to it, was it hidden, did it die out? No… From meeting people on Twitter and other places, SoundCloud, YouTube and forums I found it was very much alive.

Great music is hidden.

There were others doing this, there were people like myself with the drive to be heard. Help groups, and Internet radio started popping up, like Bluetown Electronica on Facebook, Revival Synth, one guy who has been running his group well before #WEATNU started. Tracy Perry (Expansion of Presence) who has helped many indie artists for years and years, and continues to do so. Dr. Bones, an avid lover of The Underground scene from Canada, and so and so on. This was during 2013–2014.

I started thinking, “why is it so hard just to belong to a simple label, one without the rules many other mainstream ones cause to you endure? One that we all needed.” I said in my heart, “I will create an organization that will allow others to go up the ladder with me for free, and all of us will be helped.” I wanted to hold everyone on my shoulders; ALL of the indie scene on my back. I must have been crazy for thinking it. Something was burning deep inside of my soul, something I couldn’t stand any longer. I thought, “what if I create a SoundCloud group like others were doing?”, so one day out of the blue I made one called “We are the New Underground“, after having an in-depth conversation with a friend of mine through Facebook, namely, Nessi Holt who writes for a blog called Carpe Carmina. I remember telling her, “you know what! We are the New Underground“, and she said, “Yes!! We are.” Nessi Holt, did an extensive interview with me in 2015 on #WEATNU, she’s helped countless indie artists for many years, including working with RKC Radio.

The start of a new era…

After making the group, 100s poured in, during the first two weeks, it was so hard to help them all that I had to get others to help filter artists into the group. It was a phenomenon, I was hooked from the rush of helping these artists be heard. Starting to post each one who got in, onto Twitter, with their twitter @names attached so others could find that artist, making sure the legwork had been done. The platform and machine of #WEATNU had begun.

It came to me that we needed more than just a group on SoundCloud and during this time, summer of 2014, We are the New Underground was just a name. Before long, the acronym #WEATNU was born. I noticed that a lot of hash tags brought attention to a brand or groups. December of that year, WEATNU Records was born, where the artists who found us were offered a means to be part of a label, where their music mattered, and where people would appreciate them with good results.

People felt the need to be heard.

Most of all, they would at least be heard. Sometime around Summer of 2014 WEATNU [OUR] Online Underground Radio was born, and a machine was created to help the underground. People started contacting me, wanting to make a difference. Soon DJCJ of RadioCoolio, an Internet radio personality in Canada, who also helps indie artists be heard, contacted my E-mail and Facebook, and wanted to promo and spread the word.

Roofy, another artist, who spent an entire year spreading the word about #WEATNU caused others to find us as well. Including Ivan of AMNIOTIC — By 2015, in the same year, Brian Diamond who at the time was just starting Shadows & Mirrors, and is now a label owner of Electric Dream Records, also came our way to help spread the word, as he and AMNIOTIC both wanted to help the community find our artists. During this era, UK artist Craig Manga, of Manga Bros, who later went on to form (Black Box Recordings) befriended our movement and spoke highly to many of those whom he followed, which helped further our cause. His friend, Mark Forster, was a force unmatched, as he loved the underground and its artists and #WEATNU, by helping them on ArtistSignal, he will be greatly missed as he passed away some years ago.

A publication was created.

Our magazine was helping artists be heard, shows on Mixcloud were uploaded from interviews I conducted with new artists weekly, live radio with artists and new songs, showcasing them weekly as well. Special shows on our Internet radio and many other things would happen to become what #WEATNU was developing into. A driving force, a movement that was needed, that wouldn’t stop. By 2016, over 400 artists from all over the world had graced their presence with us.

A new chapter begins

The rush was intense, and it was exhausting. It was time to stop working so hard, but I still had the drive. Our magazine went away that year, radio shut down in the Summer, but the label continued pumping out new music, but slowly. It wasn’t until 2018 where I had a conversation with a new friend, who joined us that year, and she told me “you get what you put in.” So taking that advice, I ran with it, pushing hard once again but, using what I learned before and pushed the label to become what I had envisioned years ago.

2018 – 2019

Our label started releasing finally to streaming platforms, including our already releasing music through Bandcamp since 2014. WEANTU Records was being noticed, once again, restored and still a great passion of mine, even after all these challenges. The radio also returned in November of 2018. Streaming of course helped greatly, but newer artists by 2018 started finding us, and The Underground was still being served. With a dream, a vision and a little fire, anything can be accomplished. Artists who have been helped and brought to the light from this effort , are as follows, and these are just a handful – AMNIOTIC, Bleepeater, Whettman Chelmets, Adryelle, Lie Craze, Dead Scrimshaw, Amattik, AR89, Belial Pelegrim, Bufinjer, Jazzykat, DigitalSlumberParty, Jessica Grant, Fluffytails, B. Hasemeyer, Bedtime for Robots, Lemonade Kid, Meter Bridge, Nurse Predator, The Aircrash Bureau!, Sound Engraver.

The magazine returns

One night, as I was going through old site snapshots on waybackmachine, I looked up our old magazine, which use to be at weatnu-magazine.com and a flood of nostalgia filled me. Reading the articles, reviews, and interviews that many people had written, including myself, I thought it was time to bring the magazine back. I started working on a new magazine website, the one you are reading now. The artist needed a voice, not just their music to be heard, but why they do what they do. Publications are important to fans as well as artists. I was pleased to have this final part of the #WEATNU machine return, and this time, it would remain, just like its radio. With all parts together once more, Radio, label and magazine, things felt complete and it is my hope they all further the cause of the Independent artist.

The label itself has signed over 100 artists since 2014, many of which are still with us. With the radio returning, WEATNU [OUR] continues to help artists outside the label as well, be heard. With its 24/7 streaming radio, 365 days a year, and free to join. Showcasing many of these types of genres, while encompassing the electronic array.

The dream continues

WEATNU Records has taken in numerous genres and sub-genres over the years, such as Electronic, Electronica, Experimental, Industrial, Indiepop, Indie rock, Electro-pop, Synth-pop, Vaporwave, Trip-hop, Lo-fi, Instrumental Hip-hop, Synthwave, Darkwave, Ambient, Dark Ambient, Alt-rock, post-rock and so on, and we continue to allow The Underground artist to join. With the driving force of the unknown artist, we still have many people who support us behind the scenes. Many of whom are unnamed, but are greatly appreciated for letting others know what we do.

#WEATNU continues to help artists yearly, and that passion never dies. From 2014 and beyond, We are the New Underground is the heart of The Digital Underground, a beacon of hope for the artist who just wants to be noticed, without needing to sacrifice their hopes and dreams. We continue to help them. I hope this story of how we started influences you, and gives you hope that if you dream it, it will happen. We are the New Underground 10.10.2019 (originally published through Medium.com)

Almark – #WEATNU Digital Magazine – November 2019

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Interview with: Victoria Bourdeau

“Canadian native, Victoria Bourdeau has been playing on WEATNU [OUR] (main) for some months now. We finally had a chance to get an interview with her this month. Her music comes from an influence of modern dubstep, Electronica, Deep House and Nordic pop.”

Interview by Almark

How long have you been a musician?

Victoria Bourdeau: You know, that’s an interesting question! I first started writing song lyrics in 2005 when the dream really came alive in me to do something outside of the box, and it’s become the greatest creative outlet for me besides drawing. When I got my first guitar on Christmas morning of 2009 I played it immediately, however something felt off, realizing I was a left handed guitar player with a right handed guitar I simply turned the guitar around and played it upside for two months until I got my father to help me re-string it.

What does music do for you when you create it?

VB: It opens up every possible door for creativity, and self-exploration, it’s like giving birth to a new way of embracing life. With different styles come different sounds, and with that you challenge yourself to become a better writer, and artist.

Any new material at this time?

VB: Yes! I’ve just finished recording a new track Called “Captive” and I hope to have it out shortly. Besides electronic music, I am constantly writing, EDM is just one side of what I do.

I understand you play the guitar and you also create electronic music using iOS apps?

VB: Yes, that’s correct, I create the electronic music from my phone, usually starting with the bass line and building the track around that.

Is WEATNU helping you to be noticed as an artist?

VB: Of course! Ever Since I’ve had contact with WEATNU the amount of support and encouragement I’ve received over Twitter and through the community of connected artists as well as through this WEATNU Records has been truly astounding to me. I still can’t believe all of the things that have happened this year, it’s just mind blowing. Also I want to take this time to thank friends and family that stayed by my side when things got rough, Thank you!

You have some pop elements in your music, does that somehow create a bigger picture for your electronic sound?

VB: I’ve never really thought of it in that manner to be quite honest with you, when I started out and still to this day, I’ve just wanted my sound to be unique enough, but familiar enough to the general public so that they get to experience a new vibe from my work. The intention was never to gravitate attention, it has always been simply to lift people’s spirits up and to inspire them.

As far as the area you live, is there a scene in your part of Canada?

VB: Honestly everybody just does their own thing which I think is cool.

What goals do you have as a musician?

VB: I try not to set goals because i feel they can make a person close-minded, I just go with whatever feels right for me in that moment, and just embrace every moment as it comes about, good or bad.

You also sing, are you planning on releasing anything in the future with your vocals?

VB: That may be a possibility for me one day in the future but for now I prefer to just let the music speak for itself.

Do you have any fav artists under WEATNU or WEATNU Records?

VB: Mm hmm, One of the artists that stands out a lot to me in not only style but class as well is Em Baker (Plike). Her sound is dark and atmospheric but leaves a very genuine and delicate impression on listeners.

What do you think about the current scene of electronic / DIY musicians these days?

VB: I think it’s wonderful, although I’m saddened that not more are recognized in the way they should be.

You’re a passionate and poetic person, how does music fit into your background, how did you begin?

VB: Music has always been apart of me. Just before I was born my father would crank up music to find that I was keeping perfect time to the harsh and violent beats of Motley Crüe . At just four months I was whistling, and by ten months I would hum myself to sleep.

I began music by studying the way different artists portrayed and conducted themselves on stage in a way that would get the crowd going, bringing the fans into that moment with them. If the artist was disconsolate, you felt it, if exuberant you felt that! It’s all about finding your path and growing from there.

Being one of the youngest of WEATNU, what do you think you can bring to your generation?

VB: I hope to be able to give back to people through my music and to inspire people to go after what they want in life contrary to what they believe they can succeed.

What influences you as an artist / musician to write?

VB: That’s a hard question to answer because everything in life inspires me to write, the bare leafless tress of winter clinging to life for one more season, the light of the moon at night, the miracle of life, the tides of the oceans and how the sea creatures respond to the different levels of water in their environment. Every little aspect of life is truly miraculous and breathing taking for me so it’s hard to answer that completely. I’m sorry.

Dreams of becoming?

VB: Someone who is able to inspire at least one person.

Tell us more about your new EP?

VB: Captive? Well It takes the form of many styles some of which are mixed. Deep House, Trap, EDM, Heavy Bass, Nordic Pop ect. For me it’s all about pushing the limits and not staying in one square box, because in time if I want to focus on one platform, it’s not something that wouldn’t have been familiar in my other music. The point is to stay as original as possible but also to constantly change it up, to have it be that no two songs are alike. I want each song on its own to speak for itself. That to me is how to keep things alive and is what the songs on my coming EP represent.

If there was one thing in life you could be remembered for what would it be?

VB: Being a risk taker.

Where do you see #WEATNU going in the next decade?

VB: I see it becoming a world-wide spread community of thriving artists.

Bagels or Donuts?
VB: Why do you do this to me!! Both are great but I’m afraid I have to choose Donuts, I’m so sorry Bagels!!

#WEATNU Digital Magazine – Jan 25, 2016

Follow Victoria on Twitter:

With all respect: We lost Victoria in 2018, she was a greatly talented artist and one of us, she will never be forgotten.’

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DIY / Electronic culture

Culture is an important part to music, as it dictates the direction of future music generations. Groups of people form together to make micro-scenes, one side you have Vaporwave, the other you have experimental / avant-garde, Synthwave, Synthpop and Dreampop. We’re living in a time where we no longer need to be fed music to find what we like; instead we search on the net. Indie music has always been the entrance to the underground. But the underground is far larger than the mainstream. Punk, Electronica, Techno, DnB, IDM. Have all come from the underground scene. There is a paradigm shift happening now, the Internet, social media and musicians can now form as one to share, over-share and saturate the virtual music scene. A flood of musicians pour into groups, forums, facebook, twitter and of course Tumblr at every moment. WEATNU is part of that culture, instead of filling it with confusing noise, it is filling the music world with an identity and culture #WEATNU culture. After nearly two decades we are seeing what Electronic music is becoming. The DIY scene + Electronic, is bringing to our ears, for the first time soloists in droves. Many of us who are in our 30s grew up listening to Grunge music and then later we broke away to find something different, thus the Electronic / DIY community began in our homes, apt’s, bedrooms and garages. Artists have to find ways to share their art, and WEATNU took that opportunity in doing so. Solo Electronic music is the future of music itself. The idea of the band is now a guy/girl on stage with a monome, ableton live, laptop and a small MIDI Controller.

But culture also encompasses the vibe itself, the DIY musician or band is elevated off the ground through their own promotion. Twitter becomes the manager, Facebook becomes the way to show others what you do and the list goes on. DIY culture is important because it tells another side of music history. What was born from the Internet after the year 2000 was this culture and it’s here to stay. WEATNU continues to discover and bring forth the greatest of these artists, their voices are heard from a great distance through the talent they display; whereas other publications and radio might dismiss their existence.  WEATNU is a culture all its own. An audience of fans waiting to hear something new and unique. The community of listeners become the culture and WEATNU is slowly becoming a hidden part of pop culture itself. In time it will be noticed by more and the artists who are both band and solo alike will have a platform to stand on and show their music to the world.

But there is more to the world of Electronic than DIY solo artists. WEATNU progresses through its search of the hidden artist, now pushing its way into the dance community. Holding together the experimentalist, producer, composer and finally DJ. Such a movement of avid artists creates avid fans. With the likes of labels such-as WARP Records and Ninja Tune, WEATNU is just as important as not only a movement but a record label as well. Net-radio continues to play the artists 24/7. For every new act that the DIY scene discovers, the music world continues to progress. And unlike the world of the mainstream, underground culture is always changing, always trying new ideas. Never holding to one thing for too long. It’s a raw, uncharted world that a person could never completely wade through and find every piece of music ever created. The Internet has become that world, now with endless artists doing something somewhere in any part of the world. Culture itself through the pop craze, or pop culture has always shaped a generation. The 80’s generation was shaped by MTV and British Pop, which later became more corp driven and started to lose its way well into the 2000’s. Experimental culture is once again showing up in the world of music. But the artists of tomorrow, the pioneers who are the next Gary Numan will come through the doors of WEATNU, or have already, and one more important part of underground culture will be noted in the history of music.  These DIY artists are important to music and the scene itself. We are seeing a new punk era forming right before our eyes. Thanks to the greatness of modern technology, and the Internet’s social media. Pop culture creates itself, naturally and WEATNU takes in the acts that are unnoticed and talented.

Almark#WEATNU Digital Magazine – Dec 2015

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Roofy – Tweak Your Path

By JC Luff

“Tweak Your Path” from Corbin Roof ranks among the albums I used to keep in a wallet, with my Panasonic Shock Wave CD player. For me, Alt rock was about a re-arrangement of a number of genres into the kind of Rock that pushes the boundaries of both reality and broadcast (or publishing media), such that Alt Rock can change absolutely everything if it is embraced honestly. It’s about the right blend of tones, angst, and evolution. The layers of sounds and the experiences recounted in “Tweak Your Path” are a unique intersection of elements pure and twisted, and soul consuming… while life affirming, crafted brilliantly into a concept album that could influence Joe Camel to put down the cigarettes for a moment and consider his lungs.

When I went through a couple phases of bad experiences with the side effects of recreational chemicals, I decided that I would “Transmutate” (an Alchemical term, describing the transformation of lead into gold, for example) my fear, illness, and anger into electronic scenery and poetry. Over the years, I have met a few artists here and there who told me about their darkest hours being the brightest red lights in the jam rooms and such… However, Roofy delivers the full Monty in his exquisitely ordered, innovatively produced, and over all stone cold real cross-genre opus, “Tweak Your Path”.

I would not walk into a methadone clinic and suggest to everybody in the place that they write a concept album to heal from their conditions, but I would leave business cards for roofymusic.com anywhere I thought there could be people who think that they are struggling with their monsters alone… Or unsure how to build a creative foundation for their avant garde productions and / or recital careers… But, hold the phone ! I am not saying that “Tweak Your Path” is only an inspiration sewn from adversity, or a concept album that packs an emotional response to take the edge off, as if it were tailored to the fringe culture. I am also saying (typing quite loudly) that I am going to be blasting my advance copy at the next party without a DJ, because this album is flat out sick!

Roofy’s work (in context of broadcast value) Plays aces wild and is a versatile selection of room changing atmospheres and strategically engineered synthetic tones suitable for bar, or car, or office, or home, or in a box (and / or) with a fox.

It is very difficult to combine portamento synthesizer riffs, grunge over drive (guitars), strong lyrics, and iron clad counter-culture vocal harmony… And Then … To keep a trip together with the right meter flow and progression of keys and variants in percussion structures and such. I am inspired by this album on several fronts, and would suggest Roofy’s work to a diverse crowd, such that “Tweak Your Path” is a technical, artistic, and lyrical product that is packed with honesty, and all sorts of melodies to keep those keys tapping and add a good blend to the “CD changer” I work to.

All this having been said, I would like to tell all you cats out there in radio land that Corbin has been sober for over a year and three months, and that half of all proceeds of sales from “Tweak Your Path” will contribute to fellowships helping those who are struggling with addiction to give something back to society. There is absolutely no shame in being sober. Being an advocate for supporting individuals struggling with addiction shows society that even an artist named Roofy can create music that is worthwhile and serves a greater purpose.

You Can find “Tweak Your Path” on Bandcamp

Corbin Roof has created a gofundme campaign for the album to raise awareness for addiction. Even if the music is not your cup of tea, you can still help by going to the link below. Donations are appreciated.

https://www.gofundme.com/twcna538

 

Follow Roofy on Twitter. 

#WEATNU Digital Magazine Dec 2015

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Interview with Corbin Roof

A most prolific and unique musician. Corbin Roof comes from South Carolina with his genre-jumper electronic music. Now transitioning into sleep therapy and ASMR. Part of the #WEATNU machine, promotional indie supporter and music lover.”

Interview by Almark

Being one of the leading supporters, promoters of #WEATNU in a whole, you also write your own special style of electronic music. Would you like to talk about what it means to be a genre-jumper?

CR: It’s a term I coined as I started creating so many different types of musical pieces as a solo artist. I used to focus on just one type of genre per piece I was writing, but eventually I decided to starting putting two opposing styles together per song. Eventually I started writing more electronic rock music as it is easiest for me to produce with what I have readily accessible as far as instruments. The next album will also contain some electro-acoustic.

It’s a very cool concept. I hear all kinds of things, like a mid 90s sound, Fatboy slim, Dust brothers, NIN in your music, did you listen to a lot of those bands during that time?

CR: Fatboy Slim and his videos by Spike Jonez were a staple for me back in the 90’s. I saw NIN live in Columbia with the Jim Rose circus sideshow opening for them. I’ll never forget the level of stereo effects in that concert as sounds seemed to bounce from every sector of the crowd. I didn’t start wanting to create that kind of music though until after “The Fragile” album finally came out.

I hear a very NIN driven influence on Crowd Mover, along with a early 90s hip hop synth melody happening in the background.

CR: I bought a bass effects pedal that had great distortion patches. For some of my earliest albums I had would forgo guitars completely and just use distorted bass.

The album Sampler: ElectroRok is very speaker punishing, kicks you in your arse pretty hard.

CR: I LOVE DISTORTION (if you can’t tell)!!!!!!! I use the Scream distortion effects processor on Reason for literally most of my drums. Gives a more rounded sound quality to add distortion with some other clean percussion.

Are you using a heavy hand on the low EQ freqs in this album, really shakes the room on subs?
Though as you can guess, not everyone has access to subs. True, the distortion is very punishing on this album. How many instruments are you playing on the album?

CR: That’s that sub bass!!! I take it upon myself to listen to my music over at least three different sets of speakers before allowing the public to hear any piece. I usually start out with the Roland monitors while creating and mixing. Then playback on the iPhone6 to examine clarity over very small speakers. Then I have a small Bluetooth speaker that adds a little bass to it. Lastly, I listen to the piece over the car stereo; that also is equipped with sub bass, and test overall quality and peak volume.

Also, I’m playing seven different instruments over that album. Just bare in mind The Sampler albums span the last nine years, and I had a lot of different equipment back then.

So it’s a work as you go type album?
How did you happen to make all tracks sound like they were recorded in the same time period?

CR: That is due to a process I fine tuned for recording and mixing using Sonor and Reason. I had a PA system that I was running all the recorded instruments through. There is a faint hum or hiss in the background, and when I had an older DELL laptop I would occasionally get some bleed through of static from the computers audio processor. Something I couldn’t get a round with that recording process but now that I’m using a different laptop and recording process, I have lost that static.

You’re an advocate for the indie artist, what do you see happening in #WEATNU? 

CR: I see a lot of unclaimed opportunity for those not understanding why promoting others works most effectively for artists not willing to pay for promotion. If we started charging for promotion packages, like the spam I get and disregard all the time on Twitter, our movement would implode in a short time as members decided to weigh other options. WEATNU is what we as a whole make of it and as more join in I’m seeing that there are more and more serious supporters that are willing to promote other WEATNU artists, and the radio helps as well.

What is missing from #WEATNU that could possibly be corrected to further the advancement of this movement? Allowing us to reach the masses as this is our goal?

CR: Well I am forgoing the video for UNSTOPPABLE for a little while to work on two promotional videos for the WEATNU movement. I was actually waiting until this interview to unveil this idea to you and the rest of our members: artists placement. In the second year of WEATNU’s existence I would like to get more involved with each of the artists that are willing to take part in artists placement. And by the third year actually put artists placement into effect. There are some extremely talented musicians and minds in our movement and those that are dedicated from the beginning of their membership until the very end should be given a chance to find placement in film, TV, and advertisement if they so choose. It will show a real commitment from the movement to find placement for their music and in turn if they truly understand why the movement works so effectively for those willing to support it they will be more inclined to donate their time and money to its cause.

That’s a great idea, how would you go about giving them placement in tv?

CR: Well sites like Music Clout make you pay for a subscription through them to get “opportunities” to submit to various movies and advertising. This would NOT be a subscription or membership… It would be an opportunity for those that have seriously donated time and or money to WEATNU. I would talk personally about this to each member that fits that criteria and work on outlets for them on an individual basis. Each of the opportunities that are on those sites are posted all over the Internet, if you know where to look or even more importantly have the time to look. Weatnu Records is where I would start. I may not always have the time, as a father of soon to be 2 little girls, to make music, I will still devote my time to helping others.

It seriously just depends on what the opportunities posted are looking for. Some are just looking to fill a library of music for whatever is needed at the time the agency needs it. The problem is that our members are sitting on a LOT of great music that needs to get out there, but they don’t necessarily have the time to put into finding where it can go and be heard or hopefully heard.

So you’re working on yet another album, this time under Roofy?

Yes, but not under Roofy, only Corbin Roof. It’s an acoustic electronic album, “I’m starting for next year.” Roofy will have TWEAK YOUR PATH finishing out this year and then REWIRED next year & a few here and there collaborations. While I’m focusing on Corbin Roof branding next year to get into position for the children’s album 2017.

I figure shooting for a goal that far ahead will help to solidify the brand by that point as the sleep aid/ambient ASMR albums have been selling pretty well in comparison thus far.

You’ve also been writing on a new blog through tumblr called The Greatest Unknown musicians of our time, how is that going?

CR: I sometimes feel like I need a huge office with a cheap yet highly functional IKEA desk. Just got in all the musicians info for their spotlights on November’s blog, and already got the next batch of musicians together for December. So if anyone is interested, they can contact me and get on the waiting list. I have decided to contact Jordan Pier of Leaving Richmond at the last minute as his EP just came out (which is amazing) and really needs some exposure. “Just doing my job…” or something to that effect.
I have decided to just delve into everything I can possibly to continue the campaign for Roofy and start branding Corbin Roof with the goal of doing some “street” performances of my up coming album “The Semi-Hollow Box”.

#WEATNU Digital Magazine – Oct 29, 2015

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Uncles of Wise – Flyt

By Michael O’Morah

Uncles of Wise have landed with a paradoxically energetic yet relaxing EP entitled Flyt, released by Weatnu Records. Spawned from the Trivia Corporation. Uncles of Wise have been creating an exquisite brand of Electronica, House, Techno, Ambient and Dub since 1994 by direction of solo Sheffield artist, who simply goes by the same name.
Due to the eclectic style and methods by which Uncles of Wise composes music, I found it difficult to put my finger on any direct influences for this EP. However, Uncles of Wise have revealed, Underworld, Orbital, deadmau5, Daniel Avery, Chemical Brothers, The Black Dog and The Orb to be some of his favorite Artists. Now, it would be no surprise where I to learn that The Orb, Deadmau5, Chemical Brothers and the like, led Uncles of Wise to soar into these Techno-spheric Skies, but they are certainly a unique species themselves.
After I listened to the EP, Flyt, I decided to do a little reflecting back through the Uncles of Wise Discography. As indulged in this nostalgia, I could detect faint traces of Panopticon, and Circles evincing that Flyt has kept the line of Heredity strong and cogent. Uncles of Wise stand true to the’ Musical Style the UK artist has developed while ratcheting down the vocals a bit.
This Minimalist approach is most alluring, effectively enveloping the listener in a vortex of swirling, pulsating rhythms that lift you out of Urban drudgery. Flyt is an ambient journey that can whiz one through fast-moving Synthesizer Sequences which ripple by and spiral through scales of irresistible syncopation to the Rhythm of a clap and foot-thumping bass-driven Techno House and Big Beat. Meanwhile beckoning Female Vocals slip in and out with sultry echoes of siren song through the wormholes of your Conscious Mind.
I found the experience of listening to the three tracks of the EP to be an very engrossing experience. It felt warm and comfortable like I was ensconced in a booth near the back of the Mezzanine of a posh nightclub, while enjoying my drink with an old Friend or some new Companion! If you’re into Techno on the mellow side with a hot-house beat, then Flyt by Uncles of Wise will certainly take you where you want to be. Flyt is available on Weatnu Records.

Also on Bandcamp

Follow Uncles of Wise on Twitter.

#WEATNU Digital Magazine

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SlowBurnBlue – Mangabros

By JC Luff

Throughout the composition process of this review, I have been listening to the work I have set out to describe with a pocket recorder (or unplugged electric bass guitar) clenched tightly in my office recliner, putting together scraps of thought that will attempt to provide for an account of my listening experience, one of such fragments being :

A dangerous and opaque celebration of an obligatory departure from communicable reality through the walls of self conception and into the outskirts of mind, on the wings of an electrical socket and some furniture.

I have spent a couple days listening to the Mangabros, and their creations have consumed my intersection of space in time most efficaciously, providing for a change in pace to my weekend that has inspired some useful scribbles . The Mangabros do not produce ambient music to play over a cup of tea and some baked goods with company on a summer afternoon, they produce an architecture of sounds to convey a poetry that will surely inspire one to go forth and create, leaving weird splatters of ectoplasm on the walls of what used to be the daily state of affairs.

“SlowBurnBlue” from the Mangabros (hailing from the UK) is an experience that (in my experience with the album) will leave a different impression after each listening session as the atmospheres are elaborated. I am almost tempted to set up ultra-violet lights and radio equipment to measure the electromagnetic ambiance of the environment where I have been listening to the Mangabros, but it is probably best for my psychiatric health that I leave some things unexplained.

It is not usually my policy to make mention of intoxicants in my compositions, however (as an exception), I feel that I should advise the first time listener to the Mangabros that operating a motor vehicle, or otherwise traveling out and about, through traffic and such is to be avoided…

“A short while Later” :

After a few sessions of listening, I now find myself in the process of calibrating my sound system to reproduce the sounds of “Test one” as best I can, so as to enjoy the full scope of the production work I am about to soak my weekend psyche through. I have never before listened to an album that begins with a sound-check… The game has now changed

The evening activity sets in to brace my silence for a rearrangement of this mortal conception of the local scenery… and all I can scratch down on my notebook is that listening to the Mangabros is one hell of an activity.

As I proofread my final draft of this review for the Mangabros,

I “follow the signal into these late hours through a gripping submersion into a deep pool of sonic flash lights, leaving only brilliantly processed shadows to retrace my steps back to waking mind, keeping a pocket recorder providing more questions than answers beside me, to at some point find myself before a frothy mug of rich and hypnotic bass in the corner of a downtown hotel room, chain-smoking and trying not to allow my mind to cave in on itself”.

I can say with the utmost of certainty, that (outside of jam sessions) it has been over ten years since a work of music has (by a mechanism beyond the grasps of my descriptive ability) has forced me into a recliner, scaling up and down an unplugged instrument while my office takes on the ambiance of what I can only describe as being a jilted gray-scale parallel to Andy Warhol’s notorious “Factory” of the nineteen sixties on a Sunday afternoon in the vinyl siding fields of North-American suburbia.

The synthesized melodies are interwoven into a smoky fabric assembled in multitudinous nerve blurring structures of a trip through a concise poetry that has brought me to the ledge of a day unknown in the life of a future.

The soulful melodies and potent vocal stylings entrance my fleeting attention to the point that I am in fact having difficulty proofreading. I am experiencing something similar to a disassociative effect, but the narratives re-assure me that all is not well in this world, so I have somehow been allowed to continue.

“The eerie siren song of a post apocalyptic rain fall”

Is one of the many descriptions brought into the light of my participation in the work of the Mangabros between listening sessions, and it seems to be that each time I listen to “SlowBurnBlue” , new shapes of poetry sprout up between the floor boards of the listening mind, keeping me on the ledge of the beyond. Harmoniously disintegrating the furniture behind the eyes and between the ears.

I am not going to suggest to people that they go out and seek to be resuscitated, but (speaking for myself), if I were to be artificially resuscitated, I would require a sound track from the Mangabros to do justice to the morning after.

Enjoy the experience.

Also on Bandcamp

Follow Manga Bros on Twitter.

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Shoegaze comes to #WEATNU

By Almark 

For myself shoegaze is an old friend, hailing from my teen years in the early 90s, especially with bands like Starflyer 59, The Breeders, The Smashing Pumpkins, The Pixies, Sonic Youth, Juliana Hatfield who are more indie rock and even Nirvana. When you deal with the underground you deal with it all, electronic to post-rock, then shoegaze and post-punk. For an entire year WEATNU has progressed from having one station to 4, and its latest station has taken the opportunity to allow more British Rock and ‘shoegaze’ through its doors. Continuing in the tradition of helping DIY artists and bands, it has decided to embrace more obscure styles and shoegaze seemed a perfect fit. And why not? Great music is hidden, it isn’t found on top 40. Bands and solo artists alike can benefit from WEATNU, because it’s free. Transmission Nova, will play many styles of noise rock, indie pop, dream pop, ethereal even bat cave eventually, including goth. So indeed Transmission Nova is the guitar side to ‘We are the New Underground.’ This brings even more fans to this movement. Our roots will always be in the electronic, and shoegaze is closely related to electronic music. Joy Division were experimenting with the new wave sound long before it was popular. So it’s not surprising that they, minus Ian Curtis became New Order. WEATNU is about preserving the history of music, including electronic music and more. The underground should be and is appreciated here. It’s obvious that the world is craving something more, something pure, and underground music fits that criteria. We hope in time to bring some of these artists to Weatnu Records. So far we have been featuring music by Ummagma, including the releases on Raphalite Records as well Shameless Promotion. In time,  by allowing these fantastic musicians through our doors, it will ensure that both sides meet, and the music created throughout WEATNU will grow and flourish across the Internet, making a name for ourselves and our artists. (Transmission Nova closed in 2016, this is part of #WEATNU history.)

Follow Transmission Nova WEATNU [OUR] playlist on Twitter. 

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Almark: A Conversation on the Creative Process

Interviewed by Belial Pelegrim

Follow Almark on Twitter

Date on Oct 8 2015

BP: So I really enjoyed your work on the last Abstract Alpha show.

Almark: Thank you. Did you know “Return to Planet Zamede” was written 2013 or was it 2012.
It’s a rare track that no one ever listens to.

BP: No, I wasn’t sure how old it was, but it certainly fits the format to a tee!

Almark: I’m about to release my first single in a long time. A new single to “The Scheme of Things.” I’m excited about the production of it all. It just feels right, the timing to release.

BP: When are you planning to release the album?

Almark: Probably April. Like I did with -ATD- in 2014. It’s hard to say…I need to get in gear. When I set a deadline, I push myself hard to make it. Last time I pushed too hard

BP: That can happen. Do you have everything written song-wise and you’re just mixing and mastering now?

Almark: Most thoughts and ideas are in pieces…that’s how it is when I write an album. There is no % to tell you.
A-Test, U-235 and Oracle are all going to be on the album, so I had a head start earlier this year. Once again I want to write a full album…12 songs, prob 14 including special versions like I did with -ATD-. I’ve been meaning to release A-Test video for months. Now I have a reason to complete it.

BP: Very cool, man. I look forward to it. It’s interesting to hear how other musicians work…everybody has their own individualized process.

Almark: Glad to hear that. With me I have to create something, then jump to another to get it all done because I get new ideas and instead of stopping, I save the song, go to the next project and begin using what I was just messing with. Helps me to always flow forward. Reminds me of how torrents download…you know the bits of files. That’s how it is. It’s a weird process but when you have another idea you must get it out, you must tape it or it’s too late, thankfully Ableton allows me to do this. Then I might say, well 3 hours of this thing isn’t working, get a new idea and move forward. Coming back to the last song idea later and seeing if I can add more to it.

BP: I often work like that as well, at least to a certain extent. I rarely sit down and work on one project from beginning to end. I like to have several ideas going at once.

Almark: Exactly. I remember one song on -ATD- took forever to write in that process. Forever, because I couldn’t figure out what to do at the middle, how can I end this, that kind of thing.

BP: There are times I work on something for a while, then realize it’s never going to work, and trash the whole thing.

Almark: Personally it would be hard for me to trash anything I work on, I’m a digital pack-rat you know. It’s hard to work on just one project when the demand to do more than one song must be met. When I’m on a deadline, I just keep pushing, trying to outwit myself. I have songs that are not complete from 2014 for this new album. So I can work on them as well. It’s all like torrents, in pieces but each are projects to be loaded and worked on. Though I have so many musicians I hear daily, their music doesn’t upset the flow of with my thinking. I have the natural ability to block out everything when I’m writing music.

BP: I think because it’s electronic music, you’re able to work in this manner.

Almark: It’s your own world you, do you see? I know for certain that one of these ideas is about to become a full single. It’s because of ‘Live’ which imo is best DAW ever created for my own needs, that is. Keep your racks loaded from the last idea and move forward, brilliant stuff..

BP: I agree….Live is such an amazing tool. I love it

Almark: It might be I’m writing one melody and say ‘whoa, I like that but it doesn’t fit with this song’ so I save and move forward and write more to that melody, then another song is born. Then I have to cultivate it for a while and make it final. -ATD- is a very precise album. Took 9 months to develop fully, but I had to stop for 3 months because my old computer fried back in 2013, so the release date was changed to April 2014. WEATNU has kept me super busy this last year but that’s ok, its all coming to the end, an end meaning automated not so manual now. More time to work on music again. WEATNU is at a level where it takes care of itself. All I have to do is oil the machine, so to speak.

BP: That’s a good thing, because making new music is important for the soul, man.

Almark: Music is important.

BP: How do you develop your ideas for sound design? Do you work on sounds before or during the writing process?

Almark: Usually the music is created first, melodies, beats. Later I might transition into using special techniques and effects. Sometimes I might include creating strange EQ nuances. I did that on ‘High Bias’, this weird squeaking sound when the hi-hat would trigger. And coming up with a strange effect is always interesting, because you never know how it’s going to come about, usually by accident. I might start off with a drum beat created using MIDI controller, thumb and fingers, then work on that. Or a bass line synced to it to give it an edge. It’s always different. Or mysteriously I fall asleep from working for hours on a song and wake up with a weird melody, perhaps that’s called ‘Sleep writing’.

BP: [laughs]…yes even the sub-conscious comes into play.

Almark: The strangest of songs have been created from Sleep Writing’…it’s like zoning out, half awake and doodling at the keys until you get something interesting. I use to do that with guitar writing as well [laughs]

BP: And as far as automating effects and modulating over time…how much of that comes into play when you’re developing a piece?

Almark: I’m big on automation, as it’s the key to an interesting song. It comes into play after the structure is done. Most of the time I write a song with MIDI controller, get the idea done and work on it without the keyboard. Setting up automation on faders, adding stuff to return tracks do the mixing as I go. It’s kind of a process that has worked for me for 16 years, coming 2016. (Live) just makes it more unique, it lets me create little timing modules. One song might have different starts and stops for it’s reverb. Tape Head was like that. If you look at the automation happening on the front of the mixer, it’s very robotic, return volumes turning up and down in sync to the music [thought about a video to it one day] Tape Head needs a video, but I’m selective about what footage I use, still searching.

BP: It’s quite interesting to me how these techniques really enhance and creation of electronic music.

Almark: Building blocks of sound. When it comes to melodies ‘which are important to my process’ they are like swells of sound, when you add them together in melody forms (one on top of the other), it creates chords much like orchestrations. This is probably why I call my music abstract, as there is no form or genre to it. it’s just music that fills you with many emotions. Blown Glass is a good example of this process. The three note du du du continues many times but sounds different every time. When you add many complicated and long measures of melodies and combine them, something mysterious happens. That’s how Wow-and-Flutter was born. it’s 2 songs in one. Here you have this classic thing happening in the background, which is panned for different parts one one Left channel and the other on the right. Bass clef stuff on the left, higher parts on the right. Indecently I am not an expert at reading music, I only feel when I write it. Completely by ear.

BP: The fact that the technology allows for this kind of experimentation, wild things can happen.

Almark: It’s like having endless tape, where you can mangle and mess with the sound any way you like…Ableton is brilliant software.
BP: What about utilizing samples of organic instruments vs. synthetic sounds in the scheme of things?

Almark: When it comes to sampling, I will find sounds from anything I can, any movie, anything that suits what I’m looking for and change it where you can’t tell what it is. Being abstract allows for these kind of ideas. Good example to this is my album The Nineteen Eighty Four show, using only the sounds and music parts from the film. Then I add these swells of melodies, usually 3 seconds long to play all over the keyboard like instruments. Also synthesizers are all created from VST, like on -ATD-. I use to use more analog keyboards, but the transition to digital happened with me in 2009. I don’t use real instruments in my process, but it’s always been considered.. Perhaps in time. In fact I’ve been craving a new method, to form the sounds I’m after with a high quality condenser mic. Sampling is what makes music interesting, doing it right and making things your own. I don’t always sample, it’s just part of my unique process to the music. Sampling is otherworldly, if done right, organically. Thought Patterns in ‘Documentary’ Form is a good example of that idea, plenty of sampling happening on that album.

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